Welcome to the
Vascular Biology and Development Laboratory

Hogan Laboratory page

Hogan Laboratory

The distribution of blood cells, hormones and essential nutrients throughout our bodies is dependent on the function of a healthy circulatory system. The formation of the fascinating network of vessels that permeate our major organs is of fundamental interest in biology. The vasculature is also centrally important in cardiovascular diseases and in cancer progression. We aim to better understand how the vasculature forms during development and to translate our findings into a deeper understanding of disease. We study several aspects of vascular development and biology.
 

The Hogan laboratory, led by Ben Hogan, is located at the Institute for Molecular Bioscience.  We investigate zebrafish vascular development in vivo using forward genetics and imaging approaches to visualise cellular and sub-cellular phenotypes. In particular, we investigate lymphatic vascular development and perivascular cells to understand developmental and molecular mechanisms. Our research findings have led to the discovery of genes that cause inherited lymphoedema in humans and promote pathological lymphatic growth in cancer. 
 

The Hogan Lab

  • 12

    Researchers

  • 45

    Publications

  • 6

    Projects

  • 1498

    Citations

 

Hogan laboratory research

Work in the Hogan lab aims to understand how vasculature develops in the embryo. We use genetics and cell biology and have a focus on the lymphatic lineage and on genes and pathways that play central roles in vascular disease. Our major interests are summarized below.
 

 

Gene discovery in zebrafish vascular development

What is the full complement of genetic networks, signaling proteins and transcription factors that control the development of our vasculature?
 

We use forward genetic screens in the zebrafish as our primary tool to discover new genes and molecular mechanisms that are essential for the formation of different vascular lineages. This approach allows the unbiased discovery of genes and mechanisms and allows us to discover the unexpected. We have recently completed a screen for zebrafish mutants that fail to form lymphatic vessels but form relatively normal blood vasculature. In this IMB screen, we identified more than 30 mutants and simultaneously mapped them using our integrated whole genome sequencing and bioinformatics pipeline. This has led to the discovery of more than 12 new molecular regulators of lymphatic vessel formation, new models of disease and unexpected molecular mechanisms of development. In the future, we will apply forward genetic screening to look at additional, understudied, vascular lineages and processes.
 

Recommended reading:

Koltowska K, Paterson S, Bower NI, Baillie GJ, Lagendijk AK, Astin JW, Chen H, Francois M, Crosier PS, Taft RJ, Simons C, Smith KA, Hogan BM. mafba is a downstream transcriptional effector of Vegfc signaling essential for embryonic lymphangiogenesis in zebrafish. Genes & Development 2015 Aug 1;29(15):1618-30. Journal cover art

Read the article




Hogan Laboratory, image shows blood and lymphatic vessels in a zebrafish embryo
Live fluorescent imaging of a 4 day old zebrafish embryo. Green fluorescence highlights the arterial vasculature (flk GFP) and red fluorescence highlights the cardinal vein and lymphatics (lyve1 DSred). Image by Neil Bower.



Conserved mechanisms in angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis

How do discoveries in zebrafish translate to mammalian models and humans?
 

We use knockout and genome edited mice (CRISPR) to examine the function of genes discovered in zebrafish during mammalian embryonic development and tissue vascularization. In particular, we examine vascular formation in the development of the early mouse embryo by whole-mount imaging. In addition, as part of IMB’s Centre for Rare Disease Research, we collaborate with clinicians to understand the roles of genes identified in zebrafish in rare inherited vascular disorders and vascular malformation.


Learn more about the IMB Centre for Rare Disease Research


Recommended reading:

Coxam B, Sabine A, Bower NI, Smith KA, Skoczylas R, Astin J, Crosier P, Parton R, Harvey N, Petrova T, Schulte-Merker S, Francois M, Hogan BM.  Pkd1 regulates lymphatic vascular morphogenesis during development. Cell Reports. 2014. 2014 May 8; 7(3):623-33.

Read the article


Kartopawiro J, Bower NI, Karnezis T, Kazenwadel J, Betterman KL, Lesieur E, Koltowska K, Astin J, Crosier P, Vermeren S, Achen MG, Stacker SA, Smith KA, Harvey NL, Francois M, Hogan BM. Arap3 is dysregulated in a mouse model of hypotrichosis-lymphedema-telangiectasia and regulates lymphatic vascular development. Human Molecular Genetics 2014 Mar 1; 23(5):1286-97.
 

Read the article
 


Duong T, Koltowska K, Pichol-Thievend C, Le Guen L, Fontaine F, Smith KA, Truong V, Skoczylas R, Stacker SA, Achen MG, Koopman P, Hogan BM*, Francois M* VEGFD regulates blood vascular development by modulating SOX18 activity.  Blood. 2014 Feb; 123(7):1102-12. (*Equal last author) Journal Cover Art
 

Read the article
 




Visualizing vascular signaling and forces during morphogenesis

How do physical forces during morphogenesis control vascular development and endothelial cell signaling?
 

We use transgenesis in zebrafish to label different vascular lineages, report gene expression changes and study the consequences of morphogenesis and signaling in cells. We have also begun to generate imaging-based biosensors that report changes in the mechanical state of different proteins in cells and are working towards sensors that report active signaling in vivo during development. In the future, we hope to image changes in forces that act during morphogenesis of the vasculature with novel tools and understand how this influences key signaling events.

 


Genome editing, disease models and chemical screens

Can we reproduce human disease phenotypes and study them in zebrafish?
 

We use TALEN and CRISPR mediated genome editing in the zebrafish. This means that we can rapidly mutate in zebrafish genes that are found to contribute to vascular diseases in humans. As part of IMB’s Centre for Rare Disease Research, we provide a functional genomics platform in the zebrafish to rapidly knockout genes identified by exome sequencing of DNA from patients with rare disease. These models are then subjected to detailed analysis of developmental phenotypes, mechanistic analysis of gene function and can be used to test pathogenesis of human mutations. In the future, we hope to reproduce the precise mutations found in the human population and use chemical suppressor screens to identify pathways that reduce phenotypic severity. We are currently working with collaborators to develop systems for rapid, whole embryo screening of small molecules (drug-like molecules) using high-resolution imaging-based readouts of phenotype.



 

 

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

 

Characterisation of a newly identified, indispensible, transcriptional regulator of lymphangiogenesis
2016-2018, NHMRC Project Grant
Collaborators: Dr Ben Hogan, Dr Cas Simons, Dr Kelly Smith, Dr Mathias Francois, Dr Gregory Baillie, Professor Peter Koopman

 

Novel transcription factor regulation of lymphatic vascular angiogenesis in health and disease
2015-2018, NHMRC Project Grant
Grant awarded to Dr Ben Hogan
Collaboration with Dr Natasha Harvey

 

Cell-cell adhesive force in vascular development
2015-2018, ARC Discovery Project Grant
Grant awarded to: Professor Alpha Yap
Collaboration with Dr Anne Lagendijk and Dr Ben Hogan

 

SOX18-VEGF cross regulation during angiogenesis and blood vascular development
2016-2017, Cancer Council Queensland Project Grant
Collaboration: Dr Mathias Francois, Dr Ben Hogan, Professor Peter Koopman

 

Defining the earliest events in lymphatic vasculature from veins
2015-2017, ARC Discovery Project Grant
Dr Ben Hogan

 

A critical new signalling axis in lymphatic vascular angiogenesis
2015-2017, NHMRC Project Grant
Collaborators: Dr Ben Hogan, Dr Mathias Francois

 

Using high-throughput genomics to reveal the deleterious changes that underlie paediatric leukoencephalopathies
2014-2016, NHMRC Project Grant
Collaborators: Dr Cas Simons, Dr Ryan Taft, Dr Ben Hogan

 

Functional and molecular characterization of a novel regulator of angiogenesis
2013-2016, NHMRC Project Grant
Collaborators: Dr Kelly Smith, Dr Ben Hogan, Dr Mathias Francois

 

 

CURRENT FELLOWSHIP FUNDING

 

Understanding the molecules that control vein and lymphatic vessel formation
2015-2019, National Heart Foundation Future Leader Fellowship, Associate Professor Ben Hogan

 

The genetic and cellular control of lymphangiogenesis in health and disease
2015-2019, NHMRC Career Development Fellowship, Associate Professor Ben Hogan

 

Characterisation of novel modulator of Vegfc/Vegfr3 signaling during lymphatic development
2014-2016, Lymphatic Education and Research Network (LEARN) Postdoctoral Fellowship Award, Dr Kaska Koltowska

 

 

CURRENT PHD PROJECTS

 

The role of the transcription factor Prox1 in lymphatic development
Lin Grimm

 

Characterisation of a novel molecular regulator of lymphangiogenesis
Smrita Chaudhury

 

Molecular characterization of zebrafish lymphatic vascular mutants
Sungmin Baek

 

Developing small molecule inhibitor of SOX18 transcription factor to modulate lymphatic vessel development in health and disease
Jeroen Overman (Primary supervisor: Dr Mathias Francois)

 

Functional characterization of genes identified in inherited CNS myelinopathies
(Primary supervisor: Dr Cas Simons)

 

Identification of key enzymes required for the post-translational modification and efficient secretion of adiponectin
(Primary supervisor: AProfessor Carol Wicking)

 

 

RECENTLY COMPLETED RESEARCH PROJECTS

 

Modulation of Vegfc/Vegfr3 signaling at the extracellular matrix during embryonic lymphangiogenesis
2013-2015, NHMRC Project Grant
Dr Ben Hogan

 

Uncovering a novel genetic interaction that governs blood vessel development in health and disease
2013-2015, NHMRC Project Grant
Collaborators: Dr Mathias Francois, Dr Ben Hogan

 

Uncovering genetic interactions that govern lymphangiogenesis in mouse and fish: a strategy to reveal the basis of lymphatic vascular disorders
2013-2015, Universita degli Studi di Milano, CARIPLO Foundation, Italy
Collaborators: Dr Mathias Francois, Dr Ben Hogan

 

 

 

Marc Achen and Steven Stacker
Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, AUSTRALIA

 

Markus Affolter and Henry Belting
Basel Biozentrum, Basel, SWITZERLAND

 

Mat Francois
Division of Genomics of Development and Disease, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, AUSTRALIA

 

Natasha Harvey
Centre for Cancer Biology, the University of South Australia, Adelaide, AUSTRALIA

 

Naoki Mochizuki
National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Osaka, JAPAN

 

Cas Simons
Division of Genomics of Development and Disease, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, AUSTRALIA

 

Kelly Smith
Division of Genomics of Development and Disease, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, AUSTRALIA

 

Alpha Yap
Division of Cell Biology and Molecular Medicine, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, AUSTRALIA

 

 

 

Hogan lab discoveries in the media

 

TELEVISION REPORTS


Channel 7 News Australia logo6 Nov 2015, Seven News, Australia, Heart research in Brisbane with zebrafish
Based on Ben's 2014 Heart Foundation Researcher of the Year Award and a tour of the Hogan Lab at the IMB by Members and Supporters of the Heart Foundation. The event was featured across Australia on Channel 7's 6pm News.
Seven News Report


 

Channel Ten Australia logo1 Nov 2014, Totally Wild, Zebrafish story with Dr Ben Hogan.
Ben's story starts: 18mins 20secs into the video.
Totally Wild Video




Channel 7 News Australia logo18 May 2014, Seven News, Brisbane, Perth, Tasmania, Tiny fish helping to battle cancer.
Based on the Hogan group’s discovery of the mechanism of CCBE1 function in lymphatics. The discovery was also specifically mentioned in the Queensland Minister for Science’s address to the Institute for Lifesciences, QLD in 2014. The discovery was also featured in the 19 May 2014 University of Queensland Press Release; Gene discovery points to lymphatic disease and cancer therapy.



 

 



ONLINE MEDIA REPORTS

 

2 May 2017 Scientists surprised to discover lymphatic 'scavenger' brain cells

Neil Bower and researchers from the Hogan lab led by Ben Hogan have discovered a new type of lymphatic brain cell in zebrafish, described in humans as 'mato' or lipid laden cells, which clear fats and lipids from the brain. The discovery, a collaboration with researchers from The University of Melbourne, Monash Univeristy and Japan's National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre was published in Nature Neuroscience on 1st May.

 

 

 

 

The discovery was featured on 7 international scientific and medical news sites including EurekAlert!, MedicalXpress, Fierce Biotech, Science Newsline, The Medical News, Medical News Today, The University of Queensland and the scientific blog Neuroscience News.

 

 

View all news articles via Nature Neuroscience metrics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9 May 2013, The Conversation, Australia, Animals in Research: zebrafish.
Part of a series on Animals in Research. Article features an image by Ludo Le Guen showing blood vessels and lymphatic system in a 9-day-old zebrafish larva.
Read the article

 


 


UNIVERSITY OF QUEENSLAND PRESS RELEASES

 

2 May 2017 Scientists surprised to discover lymphatic 'scavenger' brain cells

Neil Bower and researchers from the Hogan lab led by Ben Hogan have discovered a new type of lymphatic brain cell in zebrafish, described in humans as 'mato' or lipid laden cells, which clear fats and lipids from the brain. The discovery, a collaboration with researchers from The University of Melbourne, Monash Univeristy and Japan's National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre was published in Nature Neuroscience on 1st May.
UQ news article


17 Oct 2014 UQ awarded $52m in health and medical research funding

Ben Hogan was highlighted as one of 8 UQ researchers to secure two project grants as first-named chief investigator in the 2014 round of NHMRC funding awards.
UQ news article


2 May 2014 Kidney disease gene controls cancer highway

Based on the Hogan group’s discovery of the role for Pkd1 in controlling lymphatic vessel development, published in Cell Reports. Pkd1, which causes kidney disease, also controls growth of the lymphatic system, a key route through which cancer spreads.
UQ news article


24 May 2013 Cancer Council Queensland Funding

Based on Ben Hogan's successful Cancer Council award of funding for our study into determining a mechanism for regulating lymphatic vascular precursor cell migration.
UQ news article


17 Nov 2010 UQ dominates Future Fellowships

Based on Ben Hogan's successful ARC Future Fellowship, for the ‘Genetic analysis of lymphatic vascular development’. UQ topped the nation in the prestigious awards, receiving more than $22 million.
UQ news article


28 Sep 2010 Tiny fish may hold key to cancer an lymphatic disease breakthroughs

Based on Ben Hogan's $70,000 UQ Foundation Research Excellence Award. The story specifically highlights my research using zebrafish as a weapon in the battle against cancer and lymphatic disease.
UQ news article

 

 

 

22 Sep 2010 UQ researchers celebrated for performance and leadership

Based on Ben Hogan's UQ Foundation Research Excellence Award, recognising outstanding performance and leadership potential.
UQ news article

 

 



INSTITUTE FOR MOLECULAR BIOSCIENCE NEWS
 

9 Nov 2015 NHMRC awards more than $11 million to IMB research

Based on Ben Hogan's NHMRC funding award, in collaboration with Dr Cas Simons, to study how lymphatic vessels form during embryonic development to gain better control of lymphatic development in cardiovascular diseases and cancer.
IMB news article

 

8 May 2015 Funds to help UQ get to the heart of cardiovascular disease

Based on Ben Hogan's NHMRC and National Heart Foundation of Australia Career Development Fellowship.
IMB news article

 

20 Oct 2014 NHMRC awards $8.3million to IMB research

Based on Ben Hogan's NHMRC and National Heart Foundation Career Development Fellowship and two NHMRC project grants awarded to the Hogan laboratory in 2015.
IMB news article

 

19 May 2014 Gene discovery points to lymphatic disease and cancer therapy

Based on the Hogan Laboratory’s discovery of the mechanism of CCBE1 function in lymphangiogenesis.
IMB news article

 

19 Oct 2012 IMB researchers awarded $12.8M in funding from NHMRC

Based on NHMRC funding awarded to Dr Ben Hogan, part of the $12.8 million awarded to IMB scientists for health and medical research in 2013.
IMB news article

 

28 Oct 2010 Million-dollar funding for IMB research

Based on ARC funding awarded to Dr Ben Hogan and Dr Mathias Francois to study key genes involved in the development of the lymphatic vessel network.
IMB news article

 

 

 

 

 

Hogan lab publications

 

 

 

 

 

36. Bower NI, Koltowska K, Pichol-Thievend C, Virshup I, Paterson S, Lagendijk AK, Wang W, Lindsey BW, Bent SJ, Baek S, Rondon-Galeano M, Hurley DG, Mochizuki N, Simons C, Francois M, Wells CA, Kaslin J, Hogan BM. Mural lymphatic endothelial cells regulate meningeal angiogenesis in the zebrafish. Nature Neuroscience 2017 Jun;20(6):774-783. Pubmed

 

35. Overman J, Fontaine F, Moustaqil M, Mittal D, Sierecki E, Sacilotto N, Zuegg J, Robertson AAB, Holmes K, Salim AA, Mamidyala S, Butler MS, Robinson AS, Johnston W, Alexandrov K, Black BL, Hogan BM, De Val S, Capon RJ, Carroll JS, Bailey TL, Koopman P, Jauch R, Smyth MJ, Cooper MA, Gambin Y, Francois M. Pharmacological targeting of the transcription factor SOX18 delays breast cancer in mice. Elife 2017 Jan 31;6. pii: e21221. Pubmed

 

34. De Angelis JE*, Lagendijk AK*, Chen H, Tromp A, Bower NI, Tunny KA, Brooks AJ, Bakkers J, Francois M, Yap AS, Wicking C, Hogan BM#, Smith KA#. Tmem2 regulates embryonic Vegf-signaling by controlling Hyaluronic acid turnover. Developmental Cell 2017. Jan 23 Volume 40, Issue 2, p123–136. *Joint first authors #Joint senior authors. Pubmed

 

33. Bower NI, Vogrin A, Le Guen L, Chen J, Stacker SA, Achen MG, Hogan BM. Vegfd modulates both angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis during zebrafish embryonic development. Development 2017 Jan 13;144:507-518. Cover art  Pubmed

 

32. Capon SJ, Baillie GJ, Bower NI, da Silva JA, Paterson S, Hogan BM, Simons C, Smith KA. Utilising polymorphisms to achieve allele-specific genome editing in zebrafish. Biology Open 2017 Jan 15;6(1):125-131. Pubmed

 

31. Crawford J, Bower NI, Hogan BM, Taft RJ, Gabbett MT, McGaughran J, Simons C. Expanding the genotypic spectrum of mutations in Hennekam syndrome. Am J Med Genet A 2016 Oct;170(10):2694-7. Pubmed

 

30. Koenig AL, Baltrunaite K, Bower NI, Rossi A, Stainier DY, Hogan BM, Sumanas S. Vegfa signaling promotes zebrafish intestinal vasculature development through endothelial cell migration from the posterior cardinal vein. Developmental Biology 2016 Mar 1; 411(1):115-27. Pubmed

 

29. Koltowska K*, Lagendijk AK*, Pichol-Thievend C, Fischer JC, Francois M, Ober EA, Yap AS, Hogan BM. Vegfc Regulates Bipotential Precursor Division and Prox1 Expression to Promote Lymphatic Identity in Zebrafish. Cell Reports 2015 Dec 1; 13(9): 1828–1841. *Co-first authors. Cover art

Koltowska et al 2015

 

 

 

28. Koltowska K, Paterson S, Bower NI, Baillie GJ, Lagendijk AK, Astin JW, Chen H, Francois M, Crosier PS, Taft RJ, Simons C, Smith KA, Hogan BM. mafba is a downstream transcriptional effector of Vegfc signaling essential for embryonic lymphangiogenesis in zebrafish. Genes & Development 2015 Aug 1;29(15):1618-30. Cover art

Koltowska et al 2015

 

 

 

27. Jeffery J, Neyt C, Moore W, Paterson S, Bower NI, Chenevix-Trench G, Verkade H, Hogan BM, Khanna KK. Cep55 regulates embryonic growth and development by promoting Akt stability in zebrafish. The FASEB Journal 2015 May; 29(5): 1999-2009. Pubmed

 

26. Wu SK, Lagendijk AK, Hogan BM, Gomez GA, Yap AS. Active contractility at E-cadherin junctions and its implications for cell extrusion in cancer. Cell Cycle. 2015 Feb; 14(3):315-22. Pubmed
 

25. Coxam B, Neyt C, Grassini DR, Le Guen L, Smith KA, Schulte-Merker S, Hogan BM. carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamylase, and dihydroorotase (cad) regulates Notch signaling and vascular development in zebrafish. Developmental Dynamics. 2015 Jan; 244(1):1-9. Pubmed
 

24. Astin JW, Haggerty MJ, Okuda KS, Le Guen L, Misa JP, Tromp A, Hogan BM, Crosier KE, Crosier PS. Vegfd can compensate for loss of Vegfc in zebrafish facial lymphatic sprouting. Development. 2014 Jul; 141(13):2680-90. Pubmed
 

23. Chang GH, Lay AJ, Ting KK, Zhao Y, Coleman PR, Powter EE, Formaz-Preston A, Jolly CJ, Bower NI, Hogan BM, Rinkwitz S, Becker TS, Vadas MA, Gamble JR. ARHGAP18: an endogenous inhibitor of angiogenesis, limiting tip formation and stabilizing junctions. Small GTPases. 2014 Jul; 5(3):1-15.
 

22. Coxam B, Sabine A, Bower NI, Smith KA, Pichol-Thievend C, Skoczylas R, Astin JW, Frampton E, Jaquet M, Crosier PS, Parton RG, Harvey NL, Petrova TV, Schulte-Merker S, Francois M, Hogan BM. Pkd1 regulates lymphatic vascular morphogenesis during development. Cell Reports. 2014. 2014 May 8; 7(3):623-33.

Coxam et al 2014

 



21. Le Guen L, Karpanen T, Schulte D, Harris N, Koltowska K, Roukens G, Bower NI, Van Impel A, Stacker SA, Achen MG, Schulte-Merker S, Hogan BM. Ccbe1 regulates Vegfc-mediated induction of Vegfr3 signaling during embryonic lymphangiogenesis. Development. 2014 Mar; 141(6):1239-49.

Le Guen et al Development 2014


 


20. Kartopawiro J, Bower NI, Karnezis T, Kazenwadel J, Betterman KL, Lesieur E, Koltowska K, Astin J, Crosier P, Vermeren S, Achen MG, Stacker SA, Smith KA, Harvey NL, Francois M, Hogan BM. Arap3 is dysregulated in a mouse model of hypotrichosis-lymphedema-telangiectasia and regulates lymphatic vascular development. Human Molecular Genetics 2014 Mar 1; 23(5):1286-97.

Kartopawiro et al Human Molecular Genetics 2014

 


 

19. Duong T, Koltowska K, Pichol-Thievend C, Le Guen L, Fontaine F, Smith KA, Truong V, Skoczylas R, Stacker SA, Achen MG, Koopman P, Hogan BM*, Francois M* VEGFD regulates blood vascular development by modulating SOX18 activity.  Blood. 2014 Feb; 123(7):1102-12. (*Equal last author) Journal Cover Art

Duong et al 2014

 


 

18. Keightley, M. C.; Crowhurst, M. O.; Layton, J. E.; Beilharz, T.; Markmiller, S.; Varma, S.; Hogan, B. M.; de Jong-Curtain, T. A.; Heath, J. K.; Lieschke, G. J. In vivo mutation of pre-mRNA processing factor 8 (Prpf8) affects transcript splicing, cell survival and myeloid differentiation FEBS Lett. 2013 July; 587(14):2150-7 . 
 

17. Cermenati S, Moleri S, Neyt C, Bresciani E, Carra S, Grassini DR, Omini A, Goi M, Cotelli F, François M, Hogan BM, Beltrame M.  Sox18 Genetically Interacts With VegfC to Regulate Lymphangiogenesis in Zebrafish. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2013 Jun; 33(6):1238-47. Pubmed
 

16. Macheda ML, Sun WW, Kugathasan K, Hogan BM, Bower NI, Halford MM, Zhang YF, Jacques BE, Lieschke GJ, Dabdoub A, Stacker SA. The Wnt Receptor Ryk Plays a Role in Mammalian Planar cell Polarity Signaling. J Biol Chem. 2012 Jul 6.
 

15. Tao S, Witte M, Bryson-Richardson R, Currie PD, Hogan BM*, Schulte-Merker S*. Zebrafish prox1b mutants develop a lymphatic vasculature and prox1b does not specifically mark lymphatic endothelial cells. PLoS One. 2011. *Equal last author
 

14. Smith KA, Lagendijk AK, Courtney AD, Chen H, Paterson S, Hogan BM, Wicking C, Bakkers J. Transmembrane protein 2 (Tmem2) is required to regionally restrict atrioventricular canal boundary and endocardial cushion development. Development. 2011 Oct;138(19):4193-8.

Smith et al 2011

 

13. Geudens I, Herpers R, Hermans K, Segura I, Ruiz de Almodovar C, Bussmann J, De Smet F, Vandevelde W, Hogan BM, Siekmann A, Claes F, Moore JC, Pistocchi AS, Loges S, Mazzone M, Mariggi G, Bruyère F, Cotelli F, Kerjaschki D, Noël A, Foidart JM, Gerhardt H, Ny A, Langenberg T, Lawson ND, Duckers HJ, Schulte-Merker S, Carmeliet P, Dewerchin M. Role of delta-like 4/Notch in the formation and wiring of the lymphatic network in zebrafish. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2010 Sep;30(9):1695-702
 

12. Alders M, Hogan BM, Gjini E, Salehi F, Al-Gazali L, Hennekam EA, Holmberg EE, Mannens MM, Mulder MF, Offerhaus GJ, Prescott TE, Schroor EJ, Verheij JB, Witte M, Zwijnenburg PJ, Vikkula M, Schulte-Merker S, Hennekam RC. Mutations in CCBE1 cause generalized lymph vessel dysplasia in humans. Nature Genetics. 2009 Dec;41(12):1272-4.
 

11. Hogan BM, Herpers R, Witte M, Heloterä H, Alitalo K, Duckers HJ, Schulte-Merker S. Vegfc/Flt4 signalling is suppressed by Dll4 in developing zebrafish intersegmental arteries. Development. 2009 Dec; 136(23):4001-9.
 

10. Voss K, Stahl S, Hogan BM, Reinders J, Schleider E, Schulte-Merker S, Felbor U. Functional analyses of human and zebrafish 18 amino acid in-frame deletion pave the way for domain mapping of the cerebral cavernous malformation 3 (CCM3) protein. Human Mutation. 2009 Jun; 30(6):1003-11.
 

9. Hogan BM, Bos F, Witte M, Bussmann J, Dukkers H, Schulte-Merker S. Ccbe1 is required for embryonic lymphangiogenesis and venous sprouting. Nature Genetics. 2009. Apr;41(4):396-8.
 

8. Hogan BM, Bussmann J, Wolburg H, Schulte-Merker S. ccm1 cell autonomously regulates endothelial cellular morphogenesis and vascular tubulogenesis in zebrafish. Human Molecular Genetics. 2008 Aug 15;17(16):2424-32.
 

7. Dworkin S, Heath JK, deJong-Curtain TA, Hogan BM, Lieschke GJ, Malaterre J, Ramsay RG, Mantamadiotis T. CREB activity modulates neural cell proliferation, midbrain-hindbrain organization and patterning in zebrafish. Developmental Biology. 2007 Jul 1;307(1):127-41.
 

6. Hogan BM, Pase L, Hall NE, Lieschke GJ. Characterisation of duplicate zinc finger like 2 erythroid precursor genes in zebrafish. Development Genes and Evolution. 2006 Sep;216(9):523-9.
 

5. Hogan BM, Layton JE, Pyati UJ, Nutt SL, Hayman JW, Varma S, Heath JK, Kimelman D, Lieschke GJ. Specification of the primitive myeloid precursor pool requires signaling through Alk8 in zebrafish. Current Biology. 2006 Mar 7;16(5):506-11.
 

4. Hogan BM, Danks JA, Layton JE, Hall NE, Heath JK, Lieschke GJ.  Duplicate zebrafish pth genes are expressed along the lateral line and central nervous system during embryogenesis.  Endocrinology. 2005 Feb;146(2):547-51.
 

3. Hogan BM, Hunter MP, Oates AC, Crowhurst MO, Hall NE, Heath JK, Prince VE, Lieschke GJ. Zebrafish gcm2 is required for gill filament budding from pharyngeal ectoderm. Developmental Biology. 2004 Dec 15;276(2):508-22.
 

2. Mawdsley DJ, Cooper HM, Hogan BM, Cody SH, Lieschke GJ, Heath JK.  The Netrin receptor Neogenin is required for neural tube formation and somitogenesis in zebrafish.  Developmental Biology. 2004 May 1;269(1):302-15.
 

1. Behan KJ, Nichols CD, Cheung TL, Farlow A, Hogan BM, Batterham P, Pollock JA. Yan regulates Lozenge during Drosophila eye development.  Development Genes and Evolution. 2002 Jul;212(6):267-76.

 

 

9. Hogan BM and Black BL. Developmental biology: Diversity in the lymphatic vasculature. Nature. 2015 Jun 4; 522(7554):37-8. Invited News and Views Pubmed


8. Lagendijk AK and Hogan BM. VE-Cadherin in vascular development: a coordinator of cell signalling and tissue morphogenesis. Current Topics in Developmental Biology 2015; 112:325-52. Book Chapter Pubmed

 

7. Pichol-Thievend C, Hogan BM, Francois M. Lymphatic vascular specification and its modulation during embryonic development. Microvascular Research. 2014 Nov; 96:3-9. (Special Issue: Lymphatics in Development and Pathology) Review Pubmed


6. Lagendijk AK, Yap A, Hogan BM.  Endothelial cell-cell adhesion during zebrafish vascular development. Cell adhesion and migration. 2014 Feb; 8(2):136-45. Invited Review Pubmed
 

5. Koltowska K, Betterman KL, Harvey NL, Hogan BM. Getting out and about: the emergence and morphogenesis of the vertebrate lymphatic vasculature. Development. 2013 May; 140(9):1857-70. Invited Review Pubmed
 

4. Francois M, Harvey NL, Hogan BM. The transcriptional control of lymphatic vascular development. Physiology. 2011 Jun; 26(3):146-55. Review Pubmed
 

3. Soroldoni D, Hogan BM, Oates AC. Simple, efficient transient and stable transgenesis with meganuclease constructs in zebrafish. Methods in Molecular Biology. 2009; 546:117-30. Book Chapter
 

2. Hogan BM and Schulte-Merker S. New animal models of lymphangiogenesis. (Book Series: Cancer Metastasis Biology and Treatment). Ed: Stacker S and Achen MG. Lymphangiogenesis in cancer metastasis. Springer. 2009; 13:27-54. Book Chapter
 

1. Hogan BM, Verkade H, Lieschke GJ, Heath JK. Manipulation of gene expression during zebrafish embryonic development using transient approaches. Methods in Molecular Biology. 2008; 469:273-300. Book Chapter